Blackbelly dwarfgoby

The Blackbelly dwarfgoby is a small, colorful fish that is popular among aquarists due to its vibrant appearance and peaceful nature. It is also known as Neon Eviota, Red Pygmygoby, Neon Pygmy Goby, Gold Neon Pygmy Goby. This fish is native to the Indo-Pacific region, where it can be found in coral reefs and rocky areas. In this article, we will provide you with a detailed overview of the Blackbelly dwarfgoby, including its size and appearance, region, behavior, diet, and how to keep them at home.

Appearance

The Blackbelly dwarfgoby is a small fish that grows up to 4 cm (1.5 inches) in length. They have a slender body with a rounded head. The coloration of this fish is vibrant, with a bright orange-red body, a black belly. The fins are transparent with a hint of orange-red. The Blackbelly dwarfgoby is sexually dimorphic, with males having a more intense coloration than females.

Region

The Blackbelly dwarfgoby is native to the Indo-Pacific region, specifically in the coral reefs and rocky areas of the Western Pacific, from Japan to the Great Barrier Reef in Australia. These fish prefer a warm tropical climate and can be found at depths ranging from 1 to 20 meters (3 to 65 feet). They thrive in clear, well-oxygenated water with a temperature range of 23 – 28 °C (73 – 82 °F).

Behavior

The Blackbelly dwarfgoby is a peaceful fish that can be kept in a community aquarium with other non-aggressive fish. Goby’s are also known for their symbiotic relationship with pistol shrimp, where the shrimp provides a burrow for the fish to live in, and the fish acts as a lookout for the shrimp. These fish prefer a lot of hiding places, such as rocks and caves, and are known to be shy and reclusive. Small groups often seen near Acropora colonies where it hides when threatened. You can see them in the wild quite frequently near shady spots and corals and at times seen solitary. It hovers above the sand bottom a lot which is a clear distinction in swimming behaviour from other Eviota species. This fish is often misidentified for the Eviota pellucida.

Diet

The Blackbelly dwarfgoby is a carnivorous fish that feeds on small invertebrates and zooplankton in the wild. In captivity, they can be fed a diet of high-quality flakes, pellets, frozen or live foods such as brine shrimp, bloodworms, and daphnia. It is recommended to feed them small portions several times a day to ensure they get all the essential nutrients they need.

Keeping Blackbelly dwarfgoby at home

To keep Blackbelly dwarfgoby at home, you will need a tank that is at least 38 liters (10 gallons) in size. A sand substrate with plenty of rocks, caves, and corals is recommended, as this mimics their natural environment. These fish prefer warm, well-oxygenated water with a temperature range of 23-28 °C (73-82 °F) and a pH range of 8.1-8.4. Their small size makes them suitable for nano marine tanks.

It is essential to provide plenty of hiding places for the fish to retreat to, as they can be skittish. A filter, good quality protein skimmer and regular water changes are necessary to maintain good water quality, and it is recommended to keep the tank well-aerated. Blackbelly dwarfgoby is a sensitive fish, so any changes in the water parameters should be done gradually.

The Blackbelly dwarfgoby is a beautiful and peaceful fish that can make an excellent addition to a mixed reef aquarium. They are relatively easy to care for. By providing them with the right environment, diet, and care, you can enjoy the colorful and unique personality of the Blackbelly dwarfgoby in your home aquarium.

Scientific nameEviota atriventris
Type of aquariumReef aquarium
SizeUp to 4 cm / 1.5 inches in length
RegionIndo-Pacific region, from Japan to the Great Barrier Reef in Australia
Ideal tank sizeAt least 38 liters / 10 gallons
Ideal water temperature23 – 28 °C / 73 – 82 °F
pH8.1 – 8.4
DietCarnivorous, feeds on small invertebrates and zooplankton in the wild, can be fed high-quality flakes, pellets, frozen or live foods such as brine shrimp, bloodworms, and daphnia in captivity.
ReproductionNot much is known about their reproduction in captivity, but they are known to be egg layers in the wild.
Life spanUp to 2-3 years in captivity
SchoolingBlackbelly dwarfgoby is not a schooling fish but can be kept in a community aquarium with other non-aggressive fish.

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